In our January e-news we discussed importation requirements into SA for used grape harvesters. In this issue, we talk about importing machinery other than grape harvesters that has previously been used in the production and manipulation of grapes or grapevines or used on vineyard soil.

In Clause 2 of SA’s Plant Quarantine Standard, a machine is described as a device that uses energy to perform some activity and is defined as a collection of machines that operate together to perform a task. A machine is generally large, complex and can’t be easily cleaned.

Machinery includes but is not restricted to: tractors, spray equipment, pruning machines, winery crushing and processing machinery, post knockers, post-hole diggers, mechanical augers, trenchers, slashers, forklifts, backhoes, excavators, tillers, seeders and vineyard vehicles used to drive down vine rows.

KEY ASPECTS:

To import a used machinery other than a grape harvester into SA:

  • Prior written approval from the Chief Inspector SA or delegate is mandatory. This means, as an importer, you need to complete a Plant Health Import Certificate request form to be issued with a Plant Health Import Certificate (PHIC) by PIRSA’s Market Access team. This PHIC form will guide you as the importer, and the interstate biosecurity department, on cleaning requirements, sterilisation requirements and other biosecurity documentation required to satisfy SA’s entry requirements for your particular import. A new PHIC application is required for each machinery import conducted.
  • Thorough cleaning with a steam cleaner, pressure washer or air hose to ensure all vineyard soil and plant material is completely removed, is mandatory. This includes removal and cleaning of any parts which may hold or hide vineyard soil and plant material and removal of covers or guards that are designed to come off or open. Cleaning is best conducted from the top down to avoid contaminating areas already cleaned.
  • Additional requirements are dependent on the Phylloxera Management Zone the machine is being imported from, the duration it has been located there for, and the specifics of the heat or hot water treatment applied interstate as follows:
    1. If the machine is currently located in an interstate Phylloxera Exclusion Zone (PEZ) and has not been in an interstate Phylloxera Risk Zone (PRZ) or an interstate Phylloxera Infested Zone (PIZ) or an interstate Phylloxera Interim Buffer Zone (PIBZ) in the previous six months, a Declaration (refer Appendix 13 in the SA Plant Quarantine Standard) can be completed and submitted. In addition to the PHIC, a Plant Health Certificate (PHC) must also be obtained from the interstate biosecurity department in recognition of the origin of the machine and the meeting of cleaning requirements.
    2. If the machine is currently located in an interstate PEZ but has been in an interstate PRZ/PIZ/PIBZ in the previous six months, evidence must be provided that the dry heat or hot water sterilisation of the machine undertaken prior to leaving the interstate PRZ/PIZ/PIBZ meets SA’s specifications. In addition to the PHIC, a PHC must be obtained from the interstate biosecurity department in recognition of the origin of the machine, the meeting of cleaning requirements and the sighting of the time/temperature logging from the heat or hot water treatment meeting SA’s treatment specifications.
    3. Where evidence in 2 above cannot be provided, or where the dry heat or hot water sterilisation in 2 was not performed to SA’s specifications, or if the machine is originating from an interstate PRZ or PIZ or PIBZ, the machine must be dry heat or hot water treated prior to entry into SA.

      For dry heat – place the machine and any removed covered or guards in a suitable room, shed or container that can be heated up to the required temperature; and apply temperature probes to the machiner and measure the surface temperature and preferably some internal parts; and heat up the room until the probes indicate the required temperature has been reached and hold the machine at the required temperature for the required time: EITHER 45°C for 90 minutes (1½ hours) OR 40°C for 180 minutes (3 hours).

      For hot water – fully immerse the machine in the water. Once the water temperature has stabilised at 60°C or higher, hold the machine in the water for at least 90 seconds (1½ minutes).

      In addition to the PHIC, a PHC must be obtained from the interstate biosecurity department in recognition of the origin of the machine and the meeting of cleaning and dry heat or hot water treatment requirements.

A reminder that all regulated imports into SA, including those made under Condition 7 Clause 2 are subject to Importer Registration. The ‘importer registration’ provides the importer ‘authorisation’ to import the regulated item for commercial purposes. The PHIC acts as the form of importer registration in the case of all machinery previously used in the production and manipulation of grapes, grapevines and/or used on vineyard soil.

A reminder that all regulated imports into SA are also subject to Direct Inspection. This is an inspection and formal clearing on arrival into SA of the imported items by a PIRSA Inspector or an Import Verification Compliance Arrangement (IVCA) Accredited Business. Penalties apply for failing to comply. To request a Direct Inspection for machinery or equipment through PIRSA, refer here. For further information on IVCA, refer here and for the IVCA application form, refer here.

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