Levy

Vinehealth Australia’s activities are funded through a levy paid by vineyard owners and calculated on the basis of the area of grapevines registered with Vinehealth Australia.  Under the Phylloxera and Grape Industry Act 1995, all vineyards in South Australia of 0.5 hectares or more are required to be registered with Vinehealth Australia.  The levy is a state tax and is collected through the Commissioner of Land Tax.  Since 1997, this levy has been set at $9.50 per hectare with a minimum of $50.

Vinehealth Australia invests funds in programs and research that seek to minimise the risk and impact of pests and diseases (in particular phylloxera) to South Australian vineyards.

Why a levy?

The Vinehealth Australia levy funds the biosecurity activities that protect South Australian vineyards from pests and diseases, principally phylloxera.

The tiny insect caused incalculable damage to the American and European wine industries in the late 19th century. In the face of the growing phylloxera threat, South Australian wine industry leaders persuaded the State Government to establish the Vine Protection Act 1874, prohibiting importation of vine material from countries and Australian states infested with phylloxera.

The Phylloxera Act 1899, established the Phylloxera and Grape Industry Board of South Australia, a statutory authority dedicated to the protection of vineyards from phylloxera infestation. The Phylloxera Board – now Vinehealth Australia – has provided 118 years of continuous service.

This long dedication to biosecurity by South Australian grapegrowers and industry leaders is a shining light of industry collaboration.

The Vinehealth Australia levy been set at $9.50 per hectare with a minimum of $50 for the past 20 years. The levy is more important today than ever before due to increasing biosecurity threats including more phylloxera detections and rising exotic incursions.

Vinehealth Australia invests levy funds in resources, programs and research that seek to minimise the risk and impact of pests and diseases to South Australian vineyards. We need a strong biosecurity voice in South Australia to combat rising threats.